WERK Reports

As part of its project implementation, monitoring and evaluation and data verification activities, among others, WERK develops numerous reports annually. These reports help maintain accountability, transparency and documentation with our various stakeholders, including members, donors, Board of Governance, partners, the Ministry of Educations, staff, etc. These reports are therefore availed on this page for information purposes, as well as to contribute to the growing body of knowledge.

 

WERK Reports

As part of its project implementation, monitoring and evaluation and data verification activities, among others, WERK develops numerous reports annually. These reports help maintain accountability, transparency and documentation with our various stakeholders, including members, donors, Board of Governance, partners, the Ministry of Educations, staff, etc. These reports are therefore availed on this page for information purposes, as well as to contribute to the growing body of knowledge.

 

Girl Education Challenge - Wasichana Wote Wasome Baseline Report (April 2014)

WWW BASELINE REPORT

The Girl Education Challenge (GEC) – Wasichana Wote Wasome (WWW) – Let All Girls Read –  was aimed at improving school enrolment, retention, attendance and learning outcomes for 124,000 marginalized girls in Arid and Semi-Arid Lands (ASALs) and urban slums in Kenya.   Specifically, the programme worked with 500 schools in 8 counties: Marsabit, Turkana, Samburu, Kwale, Kilifi, Tana River and; Nairobi & Mombasa urban slums.

Value Based Education Synthesis Report

The Value Based Education Synthesis Report documents the VBE Research, which was commissioned by the Ministry of Education to further the understanding of value-based education in Kenya. The research outcomes are expected to inform the government and other education actors about the role and methods of faith-inspired approaches to inculcating values and attitudes including identification of those inter-religious values and skills which constitute good global citizenship in the Kenyan context.

Most Vulnerable Children Access and Complete Primary Education (MAP) Baseline Report (March 2014)

MAP BASELINE STUDY REPORT

This is a report of the baseline survey of the Most Vulnerable Children Access and Complete Primary Education (MAP) 2012 – 2016 programme. The baseline was commissioned with two specific objectives: to generate baseline data on impact indicators of the programme, and to generate baseline data on site-specific Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) indicators for the programme. The programme was developed as part of the overall Concern Worldwide-Kenya strategy. The purpose of the MAP programme was to increase access to and completion of free and compulsory primary education for 320,000 most vulnerable children. The programme was designed to deliver four results: a) Communities demonstrate that they value education and safety of all children, b) County education structures deliver quality primary education, c) Improved governance and management of 370 schools by community, School Management Committees (SMCs), and head teachers, and d) Effective Implementation of Free Primary Education (FPE) policy framework.

End Term Survey on Open Space Literacy (OSL) Project in Nairobi County, Kenya (February 2016)

The  Open Space Literacy (OSL) End Term Survey Report   was a quasi-experimental end term study designed to establish the status of indicators after the implementation of the OSL Project. The study was guided by the following objectives: i) Establish the status of the project indicators as outlined in the logical framework. ii) Compare the results of the project in the intervention schools compared to control schools. iii) Determine how well the project achieved expected results in regards to efficiency, relevance, effectiveness and sustainability. iv) Establish the state of partnership between Plan and implementing partners. v) Document any lessons learnt that may be useful in the implementation of related future projects. vi) Make suggestions/recommendations on strategies to implement future OSL projects.

Out Of School Children Assessment - Dadaab Refugee Camp Report (March 2017)

The purpose of the Dadaab Refugee Camp OUT OF SCHOOL CHILDREN ASSESSMENT REPORT  was to analyse and identify the profiles of out-of-school children (OOSC), the underlying reasons for their exclusions, and how these can be addressed in order to help UNHCR and partners to understand the profiles of OOSC in Dadaab and better target response and resources. The assessment developed and analysed profiles of OOSC applying the conceptual and methodological framework for the UNICEF-UIS Global OOSC Initiative and key dimensions of educational exclusions. Issues examined ranged from access (enrolment, absenteeism and drop-outs), quality of education, transition, to school management and the impact of repatriation and relocation.

Operation Come To School Project (OCTS): Keeping Hope Alive (2017)

Final Report-Operation Come to School Project (OCTS)

This report provides a snapshot of the OCTS project activities during its first phase. WERK is implementing the OCTS project in 8 target sub-counties in the informal settlements in 521 target schools (Public primary schools and selected Alternative Provisions of Basic Education and Training (APBET) Institutions) in selected wards in the following sub-counties in Nairobi County: Embakasi, Starehe, Kamukunji, Makadara, Mathare, Kasarani, Westlands, Ruaraka and Dagoretti. The overall outcome of the OCTS project is to bring 40,000 OOSC back to school by the end of the project in Nairobi County

Effects of Post-Election Violence on Education in Kisumu (April 2008)

Rapid Assessment Report on Effects of Post Election Violence on Education in Kisumu District

In collaboration with Vision & Empowerment Trust, and supported by the Electoral Violence Response Initiative (EVRI), WERK published this report upon completion of the rapid assessment on the impact of the post-election violence on education in primary education in Kisumu. The study involved the collection of both quantitative and qualitative data/information including the voices of the girls and boys.

Operation Come to school report (2016-2019)

Final Report-Operation Come to School Project (OCTS)

This report provides a snapshot of the OCTS project activities during its first phase. WERK is implementing the OCTS project in 8 target sub-counties in the informal settlements in 521 target schools (Public primary schools and selected Alternative Provisions of Basic Education and Training (APBET) Institutions) in selected wards in the following sub-counties in Nairobi County: Embakasi, Starehe, Kamukunji, Makadara, Mathare, Kasarani, Westlands, Ruaraka and Dagoretti. The overall outcome of the OCTS project is to bring 40,000 OOSC back to school by the end of the project in Nairobi County

WWW Qualitative Study Report - Education, Empowerment and Marginalisation: Do Schools Empower Girls?

WWW Qualitative Study Report (Education, Empowerment and Marginalisation-Do Schools Empower Girls)

A WWW baseline survey conducted between July 2013 and December 2014 pointed to some emerging issues that could best be addressed through qualitative methods of investigation. These included issues relating to girls’ empowerment and marginalisation in and outside of formal education. To address the gaps a qualitative study focusing on girls’ education and empowerment was conducted in July 2014. The study interrogated the complex barriers to girls’ education, capturing the perspectives of the key actors: the girls, boys, parents and teachers themselves, and documented factors contributing to their e

A Study of Child Abuse in Kenya (October 2015)

A Study of Child Abuse in Kenya (October 2015)

Commissioned by the Kenya Catholic Secretariat of Religious Education, this report presents the findings of a study undertaken in 11 of the 24 dioceses in Kenya. The key finding is that school going children are not safe. Verbal and physical abuse is very rampant with 8 of every 10 children being victims. Additionally, 3 of every 10 children have suffered from sexual harassment and abuse. The home is the most unsafe place, followed by the school. The study informants envision a wholesome approach that involves the school and the home/community, with emphasis put in guidance and counselling for teachers and various ‘information and empowerment’ programs for children and their parents, as the solution to this scourge. A successful approach will however demand appraisal of our value system for children seem to be victims of a lapsing morality.